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Drafting Basics 1 - Online Course

Drafting a Flat Collar (Or how to add a flat collar to the Versatile Blouse Pattern)




In my last post, I showed how you might modify the Versatile Blouse pattern by reshaping the neckline, or adding a collar and/or sleeves.

Other than the Band Collar that I showed previously, the next easiest collar to draft is the Flat Collar, sometimes called a Peter Pan Collar. This type of collar lies flat against the shoulder line and the centre back; there is no rise at the back of the neck like on a regular shirt collar. 



Flat Collar Back





Shirt Collar Back


The flat collar itself is also highly versatile in that you can cut it into nearly any shape.





This tutorial uses the Versatile Blouse pattern as a base but it can be applied to any other blouse pattern with a flat neckline. Some other modifications or adaptations may be necessary but the basic steps should remain the same.


How to draft a Flat Collar:

1. Place the FRONT blouse pattern on a piece of drafting paper or standard A3-size paper is more than adequate). 

2. Trace around the neckline, shoulder and centre front (CF) of your blouse pattern.

 

 

3. On the tracing, remove the seam allowance(SA) at the shoulder. If there is SA on the CF, remove it as well.

 


 4. Take the BACK blouse pattern. Fold down the SA on the shoulder.

 




5. Align the shoulder of the BACK pattern to the shoulder of the FRONT tracing. 

6. Trace around the back neckline and centre back (CB).

 

 

  

7. If there is SA on the CB, remove it on the tracing.

 


 

8. Take note of the width of the original SA on the neckline. For eg. ¼”. You will retain this SA that is already on the tracing.

 


  

9. Mark the desired width of the collar on the CF and CB. For eg. 2” 

10. Mark the desired width of the collar at the shoulder. For eg. 1½


 

 

11. Mark your desired collar spread. That is, mark how wide apart you’d like the tips of each half of the collar to be from each other. For eg. 2” total spread => 1” each side.

12. Do the same for the back of the collar.

 


 

13. Next, draw a smooth curve to connect all the marked points.

 


 

 

14. Add your desired SA to the curve. Eg. ¼

 


15. If you prefer a rounded tip, then just draw that in.

 


 

 

Your flat collar draft is done. You will need to cut out 4 pieces (2 symmetrical pairs) to complete making the collar. You might need an additional 2 pieces of interfacing.




Try out different flat collar designs, and in contrasting fabric as well. Lengthening the shoulder line to accommodate broader collar widths is another option. As I've said before, the choice is nearly endless!

Get your Versatile Blouse Pattern here.

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